About Lord Our Righteousness

And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit

after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so.

Genesis 1:11

Tree plantation




Trees are vital. As the biggest plants on the planet, they give us oxygen, store carbon, stabilise the soil and give life to the world’s wildlife. They also provide us with the materials for tools and shelter. Not only are trees essential for life, but as the longest living species on earth, they give us a link between the past, present and future. It’s critical that woodlands, rainforests and trees in urban settings, such as parks, are preserved and sustainably managed across the world. Play your part and adopt the trees in The Royal Parks today. The canopies of trees act as a physical filter, trapping dust and absorbing pollutants from the air - removing up to 1.7 kilos per tree annually. They also provide shade from solar radiation and reduce noise. Over 20 species of British trees and shrubs are known to have medicinal properties. The oil from birch bark, for example, has antiseptic properties. Research shows that within minutes of being surrounded by trees and green space, your blood pressure will drop, your heart rate will slow and your stress levels will come down. Trees benefit the environment Trees absorb carbon dioxide as they grow and the carbon that they store in their wood helps slow the rate of global warming. They reduce wind speeds and cool the air as they lose moisture and reflect heat upwards from their leaves. Trees also help prevent flooding and soil erosion, absorbing thousands of litres of storm water. Trees boost wildlife Trees host complex microenvironments. When young, they offer habitation and food to amazing communities of birds, insects, lichen and fungi. When ancient, they also provide the hollow cover needed by species such as bats, woodboring beetles, tawny owls and woodpeckers. Trees strengthen communities Trees strengthen the distinctive character of a place and encourage local pride. Urban woodland can be used as an educational resource and to bring groups together for activities like walking and bird-watching. Trees are also invaluable for children to play in and discover their sense of adventure. Trees protect the Future Soon, for the first time in history, the number of people with homes in cities will outstrip those living in the countryside - so parks and trees will become an even more vital component of urban life. We must respect them and protect them for the future.